Tag Archive | Post Millennial Trauma: Horror in the 21st Cent

Post Millennial Trauma: Stake Land (2011)


Vampires, eh? Has there been a more maligned Horror genre in recent years than the vampire film? Seriously, they either sparkle in sunlight, inexplicably want to bang Anna Paquin and possibly themselves, or are metaphorically grooming small boys for nefarious purposes. In the meantime, a couple of films have come out that have attempted to breathe new life into arguably the most overplayed genre out there. A recent development (probably in an inevitably futile attempt to break the cycle of EMO rape-y douchebaggery), as seen last year in Daybreakers, is a post-apocalyptic twist: the bloodsuckers have won (and I don’t mean bankers) so how will mankind cope with being the food source in a devastated world? This year’s entry in my Post- Millennial Trauma series also follows this line: welcome to Stake Land. Bring your own garlic.

Read More…

Post Millennial Trauma: Burning Bright (2010)

I’m nearly up to date with my little journey through the best that the 21st Century has to offer in horror films. I did, I have to say, look at 2010 with some trepidation. Nothing particularly leapt out and made a strong case for inclusion, but there were several very solid films of a similar standard- The Crazies was a pleasant surprise, given that it’s a remake that didn’t suck, and Daybreakers was a good stab at a new iteration of that horror mainstay, Vampires. However, on the basis that Koutch already reviewed Daybreakers, and I haven’t really got a lot to say about it that he didn’t cover, and Xi did a sterling job with The Crazies, I thought I would give this little film that slipped under the radar a write up.  Read More…

Post Millennial Trauma: Pontypool (2009)

This sounds like a strange thing to be writing, but I do believe that this is the first of these Post-2000 horror films that I’ve done that features that mainstay of horror: The Zombie. Zombies are one of the most abused monsters out there- hacks like Snyder and Anderson fundamentally don’t understand what makes zombies effective, and so insist on having them run, climb buildings etc, while arguably the father of the genre, George Romero, also has them doing astonishingly stupid things (using tools) in the name of “social commentary” that’s about as subtle as a brick. Basically, zombies are scary for two reasons: they’re relentless, brainless killing machines solely driven by the need to feed, and that there’s usually a horde of them. One zombie by himself isn’t frightening particularly given that they shamble, are hugely clumsy, and any old mug can get away from them. Even the kind of mug that appears in a Romero film. Nevertheless, the 21st century has produced a couple of first-rate zombie films- just not America. Britain turned out horror comedy Shaun of the Dead, France popped up with The Horde, and Spain produced the magnificent Rec films. However, easily able to stand and be counted with those heavyweights is Canada’s 2009 effort: the unfairly overlooked Pontypool. Read More…

Post Millennial Trauma: The Mist (2007)

Quick confession time: I haven’t read the short story. I binged on Stephen King when I was a teenager, and then just sort of stopped and haven’t really had any urge to go back to them. Nevertheless, I’m assured that this is a cracking read, and regardless of that it has the proud boast of standing in the handful of  Stephen King adaptations that aren’t terrible alongside Stand by Me, Carrie, The Shining and Misery (before anyone says anything, I really don’t like The Green Mile). Read More…

Post Millennial Trauma: Behind the Mask- The Rise of Leslie Vernon (2006)

Now I’ve escaped from the more fallow years of the 21st Century, it’s time to look at some of the better horror films of the last decade. To start of this nice easy run in to the present day, I’ve got an absolutely cracking little film, and one that very nearly counts as an undiscovered gem. I give you Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon. Read More…

Post Millennial Trauma: The Roost(2005)

There’s really no way around this and it makes this series a bit redundant, but the best Horror film of 2005 was also one of the best films full stop of the last decade: Neil Marshall’s magnificent The Descent. We’ve covered this so extensively that I cannot be bothered to go over it again. So, if you’re interested in that fantastic film (or at least what we think about it) my Pulitzer worthy review is here, or Droid’s is here Read More…