Tag Archive | book

Jarv’s All New Holiday Reading Part 3

Hola,

Time to buckle up for the final part of my bumper book review piece. This time out, there are 4 novels, and it constitutes the dregs of what I’ve read on this trip to Spain. Not that these are especially bad books, on the contrary, some of them are totally passable, but I haven’t actually got anything of real interest to say about them.

This batch is a strange old mix, but believe it or not, I didn’t plan it this way. So, let’s start the ride with… Read More…

The World According to Arnie: The Running Man (1987)

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There have been an awful lot of adaptations of Stephen King’s work. According to the internets, not counting short films or episodes of a TV show (such as the X-Files), the number sits at 62. And counting. There is a pretty even split across Film and Television, with some even doubling up, such as Carrie and The Shining. Most of them remain unseen by me (something that is unlikely to change in the future), but the one’s I have seen tend to fall in either one of two categories. Brilliant or Terrible. There seems to be no middle ground with Stephen King.

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Jarv’s Favourite Books. Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis

It’s been a while since I delved back into my extensive library. Not sure why, really, other than that I was vacillating over which book to do next. Part of me thought that I’d review one of the more difficult Murakami books, and I did want to cover The Bonfire of the Vanities, but Droid’s just started reading it. However, in the end, Kingsley Amis’ debut novel, Lucky Jim, was looking at me on the shelf, and the choice was just obvious.  Read More…

Jarv’s Favourite Books: The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks

Iain Banks is, quite frankly, a phenomenon. He turns out roughly a book a year either under the name Iain M. Banks for his science fiction Culture novels (including Consider Phlebas) or sans initial. The books he writes without the initial tend to be more serious “proper” fiction and not genre work, although many of them do tend to dabble in the realms of fantasy and science fiction rather than a more traditionally literary theme. The Wasp Factory was his debut novel, and I still think it’s arguably his best work- it’s certainly the least forgettable novel that he’s written. Read More…

Jarv’s Favourite Books. Number 3: Adios Muchachos by Daniel Chavarria

That’s enough of the highbrow novel reviews for a while. Anyone that sees the bookshelf at Casa Del Jarv can easily spot a vast contradiction. On one hand there are works such as The Incredible Lightness of Being, or Kafka, and then bang next to it is some gloriously seedy piece of trash like Eric Van Lustbader’s Ninja. I read pretty omnivorously, and as such there’s no real genre that I stick to. With that minor apology, it’s time to review one of the most gleefully trashy novels that I’ve ever read: Adios Muchachos.

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Jarv’s Favourite Books. Number 2: Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh

Decline and Fall has played a large part in my life. Not my actual decline and fall, obviously, as I don’t think I have declined in any way other than physically, intellectually, and morally since I was 18 and I certainly haven’t actually fallen yet, but the book itself. Read More…

The Underrated: I, Lucifer

I was going to hold off reviewing this book for a while. However, Mrs. Jarv in a wonderfully useless move that got me out of watching SATC2 managed to lose my copy (4th one I’ve bought now), so in sheer celebration I’m going to write this from memory. I know this book extremely well, so have no qualms about taking a gamble and writing it without it sitting in front of me. Read More…

Droid defines the decades best movies – #17 Where the Wild Things Are (2009)

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Most of us remember our childhood fondly. At least, I do. I remember the fort, fishing for yabbies, backyard cricket and exploring the world (as I knew it) on my BMX. What tends to get forgotten is the highly charged emotions, the tantrums, the neediness and the fear of abandonment. ‘Where The Wild Things Are’ is the first film I’ve seen that perfectly encapsulates what is was really like to be a 9 year old. This is not the usual garbage film about childhood told through rose-coloured glasses, ending with “And after that summer, we were never the same.” This film is about the raw emotion of being a child on the cusp of growing up.

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